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arpeggios- even number of strikes per string

rafapakrafapak ✭✭
in Technique Posts: 221
Hi guys

I recently came across video I enclosed below. This guys is teaching how to play arpeggios with even number of strikes per strings. Most people when they teach arpeggios they show three notes per strings patterns etc. Can you recommend any websites or any sources where people teach how to play gypsy jazz arpeggios using even number of strikes per string patterns ?

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Comments

  • NylonDaveNylonDave Glasgow✭✭✭ Perez Valbuena Flamenca 1991
    edited August 2017 Posts: 462
    rafapak wrote: »
    Hi guys

    Can you recommend any websites or any sources where people teach how to play gypsy jazz arpeggios using even number of strikes per string patterns ?

    Yup there is a resource, your own intellect. Or call it homework if you prefer. Pick an arpeggio, any arpeggio, start on the lowest note you can find on the guitar and work out a two note per string pattern to play it. Pretty simple really.

    Think of it like maths, if you go online to get the answers to your maths homework then you are not learning maths, you are cheating..... yourself.

    Another idea, buy a good book and study it, Micheal has lots for sale and some are even good.

    I don't know if there is any advice on youtube on how to read a book. Might be though, someone talking aimlessly for six minutes and then reading a single line and then talking in an unfocused way about that single line and then putting a link to their website where you can get unconnected lines from different books as downloads etc. I doubt that it would produce any novelists, but it might do a darn good job of keeping people illiterate if that became the accepted procedure.

    I am going to get criticised for this advice, good. Too many people celebrate terrible advice and drip feed teaching. It is embarrassing behaviour for adults and gives guitarists a bad name.

    And I am not in any way against your enthusiasm, I find it commendable, it is just that you have an awful lot of preconceptions already based on looking for answers in entirely the wrong places. Do yourself a favour, start working and stop watching.

    The Romane book is good. It has pieces.

    http://www.djangobooks.com/Item/manouche

    so is this

    http://www.djangobooks.com/Item/gypsy_fire

    Think of it like this. I have a book on my shelf with the complete solo violin music by Bach. It cost me about eight quid twenty years ago. I'll never finish studying it. But I have played all of it many times. I had to work out the fingerings myself, which means I learned something. Next time I play through it there probably wont be a single page that is fingered the same way as any of the other times I played it.


    Don't cheat yourself buy a good book and then sit down and work hard. Then take a break buy another and if it is a good book you'll get back to it.



    D.
    ShemiJim KaznoskyElí SaúlJosechikyBillDaCostaWilliams
  • ShemiShemi Cardiff✭✭✭
    Posts: 170
    What do you want to achieve? You can add notes to any arpeggio shape like he illustrated to get even numbers, Gonzalo does this for his signature diminished runs. Experiment yourself, but I would say do for your own stylistic reasons and not to get around mastering the gypsy technique.

    He's a good guitar player, but when he talks about the "most efficient" way of playing I have to ask "most efficient at what aspect?" Speed? You can get all the speed you need to play gypsy jazz from gypsy picking. The most efficient way to sound stylistically accurate is to use the gypsy technique. If you want to blaze like a top shredder then alternate picking or Gambale style economy picking is great, but you will struggle to phrase those gypsy sounding licks properly. I'd rather make the sounds that drew me to this music in the first place.

    It's not easy but it's entirely possible with some hard work. I, like most of us here, have played guitar for many years and was used to alternate picking. At first it all seemed a bit counter intuitive. However, I've practiced it so much over the last 3 and a half years that it's my default picking style now. I can't even alternate pick anymore! The speed is coming, and the muscle memory is getting more and more ingrained. The best thing is the satisfaction in completing each new step along the journey, so don't cheat yourself out of that!

    Josechiky
  • ShemiShemi Cardiff✭✭✭
    Posts: 170
    Lol, it took me so long to type this out in between putting my boy to bed that I've ended up just repeating what NylonDave had to say. Some good book recommendations from him. I think the Stephan Wremble book is also a great resource.
    Josechiky
  • It's a smart
    NylonDave wrote: »
    rafapak wrote: »
    Hi guys

    Can you recommend any websites or any sources where people teach how to play gypsy jazz arpeggios using even number of strikes per string patterns ?



    Another idea, buy a good book and study it, Micheal has lots for sale and some are even good.

    I don't know if there is any advice on youtube on how to read a book. Might be though, someone talking aimlessly for six minutes and then reading a single line and then talking in an unfocused way about that single line and then putting a link to their website where you can get unconnected lines from different books as downloads etc. I doubt that it would produce any novelists, but it might do a darn good job of keeping people illiterate if that became the accepted procedure.


    D.

    Gold.

    Josechiky
  • jonpowljonpowl Hercules, CA✭✭✭ Dupont MD-100, Altamira M01F
    Posts: 706
    I like Tim Robinson's arpeggios for Gypsy Jazz. John Scrivo has some good Gypsy Jazz arpeggios, as well.
    richter4208
  • rafapakrafapak ✭✭
    Posts: 221
    thanks guys for replies. I went to John Scrivo website. I start to enjoy his lessons.
  • JDRookeJDRooke New
    Posts: 87
    Alex Simon, who just posted a Udemy lesson elsewhere on the board recently, does a lot of this evenly picked arps and licks. Since getting turned onto it last summer by him, I'm gradually doing more and more of it. It's efficient, speedy, and addicting. Like the fellow posting above said, use the DIY approach and take your arps that use 1 and 3 pick strikes per string and add another note to each (usually before or in-between em) to make the 1s 2s and the 3s 4s.

    Just go ahead and just drop it in there. Nobody will even know that it wasn't in the arp chart. ;)
  • JDRookeJDRooke New
    Posts: 87
    ...And yes, I second the recommendation of Wrembel's book for arp charts.. in particular the horizontal ones. Add notes to odd picking to make it even and you've got evenly picked arps.
  • JDRookeJDRooke New
    Posts: 87
    For starters, you've got your straight up diminished horizontal arp/scale. Then try the G-6 horizontally (3rd position) ending on the F# of the high E. Then do the C-6 (3rd position) horizontal arp (2 per string) ending on the high Eb. The last two, in particular, are foundational for both the feeling of doing two notes per string and for how widely used variations of these are by Django (over dominant C and F respectively).

    Whoa, that was a packed paragraph. Good luck with it everyone.
    AndyW
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