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seeking chord book similar to Robin Nolan's Gig Book

bohemewarblerbohemewarbler St. Louis, MO✭✭✭✭ Jordan Wencek No.26, Altamira M01D-12 fret
edited July 2012 in Gypsy Jazz 101 Posts: 223
Does anyone know of a Gypsy chord book that is in the same, simple and easy illustrated style, and as nearly extensive, as Robin Nolan's Gig Book? I like the Gig Book because it shows the grilles and where and what fingers should be on the fret and in mostly three-note chords. I'm self-taught on the guitar, so these easily played and easily illustrated grilles are extremely helpful.

I want to learn more Gypsy jazz chords to tunes not available in the Gig Book and am also interested in playing other chord interpretations. I have difficulty with Colin Cosimini's Chord Books because only a small percentage of the chords are actually illustrated, and Michael's Horowitz's Gypsy Rhythm book (Vol 1) illustrates only 8 songs.
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  • Michael BauerMichael Bauer Chicago, ILProdigy Selmers, Busatos and more…oh my!
    Posts: 1,002
    There is a Django Fakebook out there somewhere, and I think someone posted a link to a free download recently. Some of the songs are in the wrong key, and some of the chords are not what people usually play, but it is a pretty good resource.
    I've never been a guitar player, but I've played one on stage.
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,430
    There is a Django Fakebook out there somewhere, and I think someone posted a link to a free download recently. Some of the songs are in the wrong key, and some of the chords are not what people usually play, but it is a pretty good resource.

    Here it is. (PDF)
    -Paul

    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • Archtop EddyArchtop Eddy Manitou Springs, ColoradoModerator
    Posts: 589
    Here's another old stand-by site with lots of songs and chord charts. (Pick songs from column on left...) AE

    http://www.grilles-manouches.net/index.html
  • bohemewarblerbohemewarbler St. Louis, MO✭✭✭✭ Jordan Wencek No.26, Altamira M01D-12 fret
    Posts: 223
    I did have access to Fakebook pdf., but I was seeking illustrated chords in a more direct fashion as Robin Nolan's Gig Book. Thanks to you, this website is just what I was looking for and will be of great help! Knowing more of the authentic Gypsy chord positions on the fretboard, I'll be able to make more use of the Fakebook and others like it.

    Merci Beaucoup!
  • tacosandbeertacosandbeer ✭✭
    Posts: 47
    Why not take the fingerings you like from the RN Gig Book and apply them to the songs you are trying to learn.
    "Without music, life would be a mistake." --Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Wim GlennWim Glenn oƃɐɔᴉɥƆModerator 503
    Posts: 1,222
    horowitz's gypsy rhythm is the best book i've seen for good gypsy chord voicings. it's best to learn the theory first, and then apply it to songs from fakebooks - you should know several different ways to play each chord, and can pick whatever is convenient at the time, rather than always using whatever shape the author suggests. it opens up lots of doors, and it's not that hard to get down.
  • bohemewarblerbohemewarbler St. Louis, MO✭✭✭✭ Jordan Wencek No.26, Altamira M01D-12 fret
    Posts: 223
    I appreciate your recommendations. It's not that I haven't tried that. I appear to have a mental musical handicap when it comes to musical theory. Nothing seems to enter my brain through that door. I realize it gets in the way of me being able to do a lot musically. Nonetheless, as my original post notes, I'd be grateful for someone more familiar to authentic gypsy chording than I to have created something like the "Gig Book," with different tunes and some different chord voicings. I'd buy it.
  • PassacagliaPassacaglia Madison, WI✭✭✭✭
    Posts: 1,430
    Boheme, if I could add my experience, I'd say that in Michael's book, as well as Denis Chang's DVD on accompaniment (and his DC School website), well - none of these are really about theory. Denis eschews talking about it altogether, and Michael's book has very little - just the common, authentic voicings, progressions, turnarounds and so forth as found in GJ. I think all of these resources are extraordinary achievements; and all are about getting you into the meat of playing authentic GJ rhythm, not about getting deep into theory. Just my humble $0.02, but I'd second wim's opinion - get the feel for GJ voicings, find some tunes (that's the easy part - they're everywhere), and apply what your mind-hand has done, play.

    Take it for what you will - I'm still a babe myself. But I feel I've gained immeasurably from these works - would never really have been able to pick up a grille, fakebook, etc., and just go, without having the chord and progression vocabulary well in hand.
    -Paul

    pas encore, j'erre toujours.
  • bohemewarblerbohemewarbler St. Louis, MO✭✭✭✭ Jordan Wencek No.26, Altamira M01D-12 fret
    Posts: 223
    You've convinced me, Passacaglia (in acknowledgment of the presumed concurrence of others). I haven't thus far been able to make sense out of Michael's Gypsy Rhythm appendix in which he illustrates all the chord voicings in the key of C. However, I have just made the acquaintance of someone with some sense to show me what it all means (and he is a knowledgeable and excellent gypsy jazz guitarist). I vow to diligently learn the 3-note chord voicings and what it means when I'm not needing the C chord. I will also purchase Denis Chang's DVD on accompaniment today!

    Best regards!

    P.S. I have been performing regularly with a gypsy jazz group, and getting paid. I've just been playing what I'm capable of playing, mostly from making use of Nolan's Gig Book and what I can pick up from watching Youtube videos and studying where the musicians are on the fretboard.
  • crothcroth ✭✭
    Posts: 75
    Why not take the fingerings you like from the RN Gig Book and apply them to the songs you are trying to learn.

    Maybe it's just me, but i think this is the reply that hits the nail on the head. It's the first one that stays most on point.

    To the OP: Nolan's book contains just about every chord permutation used in every gypsy tune out there. It's not a matter of usung the chords he shows you JUST for the tunes he shows them to you in, but learning them so that you can spply them anytime.

    Believe me, i'm having my own problems learning this genre, so i shouldnt be dispensing advice, but i think this poster responded to your question most directly.
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