DjangoBooks.com

"Aha!" moments studying gypsy jazz

1235716

Comments

  • JonJon melbourne, australiaProdigy Dupont MD50B, '79 Favino
    Posts: 391
    @Jon, can you explain a bit more or point me to a video?
    What in particular?
  • Sorry...the Tchavolo spread knuckles thing.
  • JonJon melbourne, australiaProdigy Dupont MD50B, '79 Favino
    Posts: 391
    Sorry...the Tchavolo spread knuckles thing.

    Oh, right - you can see that pretty clearly here

    It's probably not conscious on his part, but try it - it really stabilises the hand (as opposed to the closed fist grip that others use) and increases accuracy tenfold, which in turn increases volume and improves tone.
  • Ahh. I've been experimenting with similar ideas. Thank you.
  • wimwim ChicagoModerator Barault #503 replica
    Posts: 1,457
    Matteo wrote: »
    Others call them "en escalier" or "ladder", I think Romane does. It's those arpeggios that runs horizontally on the fretboard. Not only diminished ones, but also major, minor, dominant, sixth, ninth, thirteenth, and with all sorts of alterations... Very useful and easy to remember because of their symmetric patterns.

    I'm still not sure of the shapes, what is "open" and "symmetrical" about them? Do you have example?
    I know that alternating minor thirds and major thirds, 2 notes per string and stepping up the "ladder" one fret each time, gives you a nice m7b5 / m6 / dom9 arpeggio.
  • MatteoMatteo Sweden✭✭✭✭ JWC Modele Jazz, Lottonen "Selmer-Maccaferri"
    Posts: 393
    Yes, that's the idea. But for a m6 arpeggio he alternates seconds and minor thirds, stepping up two frets when changing strings.

    An example direct from the book can be found here (see bottom of page 49 for open forms of a Gmaj7 arpeggio): page 48-49

    I'm still learning, but I can say that this layout of arpeggios was a real eye opener. In fact, I have just gone back to the book to repeat some of these things.
  • edited February 2014 Posts: 1,231
    You and wim are talking about the same thing, just a different form of the same arpeggio.
    wim
  • wimwim ChicagoModerator Barault #503 replica
    Posts: 1,457
    stuart wrote: »
    This is how I play too - I thought it was wrong! I've been trying to train myself to play with a closed fist, without much success.

    Both work. Look at hamfisted guys like romane and robin nolan at one end of the spectrum, and then guys like jimmy rosenberg at the other extreme. They all get a decent sound.

    I used to have the fingers uncurled like jimmy, but now I have them sort of loosely curled up - the middle ground, Stochelo (and Django) seem to do similar. The funny thing is it wasn't intentional it just changed over time?!

    One thing that should be known is uncurled fingers scrape on your guitar and wear out the top much more, a real problem if you don't like the look of a scratch plate on your guitar. I almost dug through the top of my cigano this way. But with my current guitar I haven't bothered with any scratch plate because I don't really ever touch it anyway.
    adrian
  • wimwim ChicagoModerator Barault #503 replica
    Posts: 1,457
    Matteo wrote: »
    Yes, that's the idea. But for a m6 arpeggio he alternates seconds and minor thirds, stepping up two frets when changing strings.

    An example direct from the book can be found here (see bottom of page 49 for open forms of a Gmaj7 arpeggio): page 48-49

    Ah yes, that's a good one. And I think Jim is right, the alternating m3/M3 one is actually the same pattern as the alternating m3/M2 arpeggio - just depending whether you put the root and the third on the same string, or on separate strings. With the m3/M3 version you are going up one fret on every string change, with the m3/M2 version you go up two frets on every second string change.

    maj7 version is helpful too, actually thats the first one I learnt. Don't know the ones for 13th, the trick seems to be less easy if its not a 4-note chord you're spelling..
    guitarua
  • MatteoMatteo Sweden✭✭✭✭ JWC Modele Jazz, Lottonen "Selmer-Maccaferri"
    Posts: 393
    The minor third/major third model was new to me!
    the trick seems to be less easy if its not a 4-note chord you're spelling..

    Well, you might get three notes on the first string, two on the second, then three again, then two etc. So you still have symmetry, which, for me at least, helps to make sense of the fretboard.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Home  |  Forum  |  Blog  |  Contact  |  206-528-9873
The Premier Gypsy Jazz Marketplace
DjangoBooks.com
USD CAD GBP EUR AUD
USD CAD GBP EUR AUD
Banner Adverts
Sell Your Guitar
© 2024 DjangoBooks.com, all rights reserved worldwide.
Software: Kryptronic eCommerce, Copyright 1999-2024 Kryptronic, Inc. Exec Time: 0.016422 Seconds Memory Usage: 0.99881 Megabytes
Kryptronic